Jazz bassist Kyle Eastwood plays Sundays in the Redwoods this weekend in Oakland, CA! http://ow.ly/BzWk9 His album The View From Here is on iTunes: http://ow.ly/BzWvz Amazon: http://ow.ly/BzWyG

Jazz bassist Kyle Eastwood plays Sundays in the Redwoods this weekend in Oakland, CA! http://ow.ly/BzWk9 

His album The View From Here is on iTunes: http://ow.ly/BzWvz Amazon: http://ow.ly/BzWyG

(via The Sarod Project)
Kirkland Performance Center presents… THE SAROD PROJECT Saturday, September 20, 2014, 8:00PM
"Indian Classical musicians Amjad Ali Khan, Amaan Ali Khan, and Ayaan Ali Khan present a show highlighting the beauty of the sarod. The Guardian calls Amjad Ali Khan “the finest exponent of the sarod.” Fans and newcomers alike to Indian Classical music will be swept away by their poetic mastery."

(via The Sarod Project)

Kirkland Performance Center presents…
THE SAROD PROJECT
Saturday, September 20, 2014, 8:00PM

"Indian Classical musicians Amjad Ali Khan, Amaan Ali Khan, and Ayaan Ali Khan present a show highlighting the beauty of the sarod. The Guardian calls Amjad Ali Khan “the finest exponent of the sarod.” Fans and newcomers alike to Indian Classical music will be swept away by their poetic mastery."

This Friday and Saturday, Lo’Jo plays Globalquerque in Albuquerque, NM! At the National Hispanic Cultural Center: http://ow.ly/BzSXq Sunday, catch them in Phoenix, AZ at The Musical Instrument Museum - MIM: http://ow.ly/BzT7X The new album 310 Lunes is out Oct 14! http://ow.ly/BoYLS lojomusic

This Friday and Saturday, Lo’Jo plays Globalquerque in Albuquerque, NM! At the National Hispanic Cultural Centerhttp://ow.ly/BzSXq 

Sunday, catch them in Phoenix, AZ at The Musical Instrument Museum - MIMhttp://ow.ly/BzT7X 

The new album 310 Lunes is out Oct 14! http://ow.ly/BoYLS lojomusic

Also this Saturday, Lucky Peterson plays the Mississippi Delta Blues and Heritage Festival in Greenville, MS! http://ow.ly/BzPQB Coming up, he plays October 3 at The Granada Theater in Dallas and October 11 at the 18th & Vine Jazz and Blues Festival in Kansas City, MO.

Also this Saturday, Lucky Peterson plays the Mississippi Delta Blues and Heritage Festival in Greenville, MS! http://ow.ly/BzPQB 

Coming up, he plays October 3 at The Granada Theater in Dallas and October 11 at the 18th & Vine Jazz and Blues Festival in Kansas City, MO.

We are looking forward to seeing Harold López-Nussa at blue whale in Los Angeles this Saturday! http://ow.ly/Bzddm Harold and his trio also play Sunday at the Monterey Jazz Festival, as well as:9/25 - SFJAZZ - San Francisco, CA9/26 - Iowa State University - Ames, IA9/27 - The Washington - Burlington, IA9/29 - Evanston SPACE - Evanston, IL9/30 - Jazz Standard - New York, NYMore dates in October! http://ow.ly/BzdTH

We are looking forward to seeing Harold López-Nussa at blue whale in Los Angeles this Saturday! http://ow.ly/Bzddm Harold and his trio also play Sunday at the Monterey Jazz Festival, as well as:

9/25 - SFJAZZ - San Francisco, CA
9/26 - Iowa State University - Ames, IA
9/27 - The Washington - Burlington, IA
9/29 - Evanston SPACE - Evanston, IL
9/30 - Jazz Standard - New York, NY
More dates in October! http://ow.ly/BzdTH

catalinamariajohnson:

Emel Mathlouthi from Tunisia- what a voice! “love is like a flower” WMFChicagi #listeningpleasures (at Martyrs’)

On tour now in the US! 

(via Tony Allen: Go Back (feat. Damon Albarn) — Today’s Top Tune — KCRW)
"Tony Allen is the man who put the "beat" in Afro Beat as the backbone of Fela Kuti’s Africa 70 band. A prolific artist in his own right, Today’s Top Tune features the multi-talented Damon Albarn on "Go Back"."
From Film of Life, out October 14! http://ow.ly/BiZJg

(via Tony Allen: Go Back (feat. Damon Albarn) — Today’s Top Tune — KCRW)

"Tony Allen is the man who put the "beat" in Afro Beat as the backbone of Fela Kuti’s Africa 70 band. A prolific artist in his own right, Today’s Top Tune features the multi-talented Damon Albarn on "Go Back"."

From Film of Life, out October 14! http://ow.ly/BiZJg

(via Jazz at Lincoln Center Opens With Cuban Beats - WSJ)
"…"Ochas," the three-part suite that will open Jazz at Lincoln Center’s season on Thursday, might rightly be taken as a grand statement honoring that bond. Or as an experiment in marrying the ritual rhythms and chants of Santería, the West African Yoruba religion as practiced in Cuba, with the musical language of Mr. Marsalis’s orchestra.
Mr. Marsalis, who composed the piece in collaboration with the pianist Chucho Valdés and percussionist and singer Pedrito Martinez, sees it in more intimate terms.
"This is all personal," he said in an interview from his Upper West Side home. "It’s about sharing, like you do in a family."
His father, the pianist Ellis Marsalis, introduced him to the music of Mr. Valdés, now 72 years old, a towering presence in Cuban music. With Irakere, the group Mr. Valdés led for nearly 30 years, as with his current band, the pianist did many things, including bringing the batá—the trio of two-headed hourglass-shaped drums essential to Santería—into a modern context informed by both Cuban traditions and jazz.
On the phone from Havana, Mr. Valdés recalled showing up at Mr. Marsalis’s home in 1996 with two pages of tumbaos, the melodic and rhythmic loops that ground Afro-Cuban popular music.
"Learn these," he told the trumpeter.
"Chucho has been like another father ever since," said Mr. Marsalis, who is 52.
And a collaborator: For Mr. Marsalis’s 2010 Cuban residency, Mr. Valdés composed “New Orleans,” in tribute to Mr. Marsalis’s hometown…”

(via Jazz at Lincoln Center Opens With Cuban Beats - WSJ)

"…"Ochas," the three-part suite that will open Jazz at Lincoln Center’s season on Thursday, might rightly be taken as a grand statement honoring that bond. Or as an experiment in marrying the ritual rhythms and chants of Santería, the West African Yoruba religion as practiced in Cuba, with the musical language of Mr. Marsalis’s orchestra.

Mr. Marsalis, who composed the piece in collaboration with the pianist Chucho Valdés and percussionist and singer Pedrito Martinez, sees it in more intimate terms.

"This is all personal," he said in an interview from his Upper West Side home. "It’s about sharing, like you do in a family."

His father, the pianist Ellis Marsalis, introduced him to the music of Mr. Valdés, now 72 years old, a towering presence in Cuban music. With Irakere, the group Mr. Valdés led for nearly 30 years, as with his current band, the pianist did many things, including bringing the batá—the trio of two-headed hourglass-shaped drums essential to Santería—into a modern context informed by both Cuban traditions and jazz.

On the phone from Havana, Mr. Valdés recalled showing up at Mr. Marsalis’s home in 1996 with two pages of tumbaos, the melodic and rhythmic loops that ground Afro-Cuban popular music.

"Learn these," he told the trumpeter.

"Chucho has been like another father ever since," said Mr. Marsalis, who is 52.

And a collaborator: For Mr. Marsalis’s 2010 Cuban residency, Mr. Valdés composed “New Orleans,” in tribute to Mr. Marsalis’s hometown…”

Chucho Valdés has added more North American concerts this month! Here’s where he’s playing:9/18-9/20 - Jazz at Lincoln Center with Wynton Marsalis & Pedrito Martinez Group9/23 - Colgate University - Hamilton, NY, FREE9/26 - Markham Theatre for the Performing Arts - Markham, ON10/2 - Missouri Theatre - Columbia, MO10/4 - Annenberg Center for the Performing Arts - Philadelphia, PA

Chucho Valdés has added more North American concerts this month! Here’s where he’s playing:

9/18-9/20 - Jazz at Lincoln Center with Wynton Marsalis & Pedrito Martinez Group
9/23 - Colgate University - Hamilton, NY, FREE
9/26 - Markham Theatre for the Performing Arts - Markham, ON
10/2 - Missouri Theatre - Columbia, MO
10/4 - Annenberg Center for the Performing Arts - Philadelphia, PA

McCoury, Russell explore American folk traditions - The Boston Globe
”..The relationship between bluegrass and the blues will be explored on Friday in a concert celebrating the music of a foundational figure in each style — Bill Monroe and Muddy Waters, respectively…
Russell’s latest album is a collection of songs associated with her father, Luis Russell, the jazz bandleader and musical director for Louis Armstrong. But she first became enamored with string-band music as a teenager, and remembers seeing Monroe play a few times in the 1970s. She played mandolin in two traditional-minded groups back in those days, gigging at coffeehouses and street fairs.
“I started learning about black string-band music, and just how close the origins of those two cultures were,” she says. “It’s kind of the same thing, if you don’t throw all the laws and other stuff in the way. People really needed each other to grow as musicians.”
She says Waters’s force as a vocalist is his prime influence on her work.
“For me, it’s a very commanding yet vulnerable thing: You have kind of a strong sense of yourself, but yet you’re still asking questions within the tunes,” she says of Waters. “There’s no questioning where the person’s coming from — it’s from the heart, always. I can listen to the same tune over and over and it always sounds new to me.”
She says she aims to sit in with McCoury on Friday. For his part, the bluegrass icon says he’s most comfortable in his own idiom, but is up for anything…”

McCoury, Russell explore American folk traditions - The Boston Globe

”..The relationship between bluegrass and the blues will be explored on Friday in a concert celebrating the music of a foundational figure in each style — Bill Monroe and Muddy Waters, respectively…

Russell’s latest album is a collection of songs associated with her father, Luis Russell, the jazz bandleader and musical director for Louis Armstrong. But she first became enamored with string-band music as a teenager, and remembers seeing Monroe play a few times in the 1970s. She played mandolin in two traditional-minded groups back in those days, gigging at coffeehouses and street fairs.

“I started learning about black string-band music, and just how close the origins of those two cultures were,” she says. “It’s kind of the same thing, if you don’t throw all the laws and other stuff in the way. People really needed each other to grow as musicians.”

She says Waters’s force as a vocalist is his prime influence on her work.

“For me, it’s a very commanding yet vulnerable thing: You have kind of a strong sense of yourself, but yet you’re still asking questions within the tunes,” she says of Waters. “There’s no questioning where the person’s coming from — it’s from the heart, always. I can listen to the same tune over and over and it always sounds new to me.”

She says she aims to sit in with McCoury on Friday. For his part, the bluegrass icon says he’s most comfortable in his own idiom, but is up for anything…”