Adnan Joubran “is a ferociously gifted oud player in his own right…the relaxed mood owes much to the small band of collaborators who join him here; most notably cellist Valentin Moussou, who brings a wistful elegance to the original compositions…What this recording doesn’t have is the rigour and obsessive attention to detail that characterise Le Trio Joubran’s CDs. However…this is part of Behind Borders charm.” - 4 STARS, Songlines Magazine

Adnan Joubran “is a ferociously gifted oud player in his own right…the relaxed mood owes much to the small band of collaborators who join him here; most notably cellist Valentin Moussou, who brings a wistful elegance to the original compositions…What this recording doesn’t have is the rigour and obsessive attention to detail that characterise Le Trio Joubran’s CDs. However…this is part of Behind Borders charm.” - 4 STARS, Songlines Magazine

Adnan Joubran BORDERS BEHIND Trailer (by Adnan Joubran)

Pre-order it on iTunes: http://ow.ly/vlWVT or Amazon: http://ow.ly/vlX7j

Out next Tuesday - along with Melingo’s Linyera and Natalia M. King’s SoulBLAZZ - is the first solo album by Adnan Joubran of Le Trio Joubran: Borders Behind! Pre-order it on iTunes: http://ow.ly/vlWVT or Amazon: http://ow.ly/vlX7j On “Borders Behind”, Adnan Joubran collaborates with the Indo-French tabla player Prabhu Edouard, the French cellist Valentin Moussou and the Spanish saxophonist and flautist Jorge Pardo. The music radiates both tenderness and strength, suffused with the heady perfumes of jazz, all spun together by the intricate touch of Joubran’s oud.

Out next Tuesday - along with Melingo’s Linyera and Natalia M. King’s SoulBLAZZ - is the first solo album by Adnan Joubran of Le Trio Joubran: Borders Behind! Pre-order it on iTunes: http://ow.ly/vlWVT or Amazon: http://ow.ly/vlX7j 

On “Borders Behind”, Adnan Joubran collaborates with the Indo-French tabla player Prabhu Edouard, the French cellist Valentin Moussou and the Spanish saxophonist and flautist Jorge Pardo. The music radiates both tenderness and strength, suffused with the heady perfumes of jazz, all spun together by the intricate touch of Joubran’s oud.

(via Womadelaide: Emel Mathlouthi and Rachid Taha review | Music | theguardian.com)
"… in 2007 her protest tune Kelmti Horra (My Word Is Free) became the ubiquitous soundtrack to the wave of change in the Middle East.
For her first Australian show, Mathlouthi chooses to debut the music she has been working on since the emergence of that song. It’s a darker, harder-edged sound driven by a laptop and a violin. But it’s the astonishing range and sensuousness of Mathlouthi’s voice that is most compelling. There are swoops and growls reminiscent of Bjork, whom she cites as a major influence, and even traces of her goth past as she picks out minimal, reverberant lines on electric guitar which make you wonder if she’s also been listening to the XX .
The encore is a surprise: a solo version of Leonard Cohen’s Hallelujah by way of Jeff Buckley, before she closes with the surprisingly fragile, deceptively undemonstrative tune capable of felling a regime. “Marry me Emel!” shouts a smitten admirer. “Okay,” she replies. He may need to join the queue.”

(via Womadelaide: Emel Mathlouthi and Rachid Taha review | Music | theguardian.com)

"… in 2007 her protest tune Kelmti Horra (My Word Is Free) became the ubiquitous soundtrack to the wave of change in the Middle East.

For her first Australian show, Mathlouthi chooses to debut the music she has been working on since the emergence of that song. It’s a darker, harder-edged sound driven by a laptop and a violin. But it’s the astonishing range and sensuousness of Mathlouthi’s voice that is most compelling. There are swoops and growls reminiscent of Bjork, whom she cites as a major influence, and even traces of her goth past as she picks out minimal, reverberant lines on electric guitar which make you wonder if she’s also been listening to the XX .

The encore is a surprise: a solo version of Leonard Cohen’s Hallelujah by way of Jeff Buckley, before she closes with the surprisingly fragile, deceptively undemonstrative tune capable of felling a regime. “Marry me Emel!” shouts a smitten admirer. “Okay,” she replies. He may need to join the queue.”

En Chordais and Kyriakos Kalaitzidis perform music from their March release The Musical Voyages of Marco Polo at The Lincoln Center for the Performing Arts this Thursday! http://ow.ly/tZhZk
The group also performs in NYC on Friday at Alwan for the Arts and Saturday at The Lincoln Center’s Atrium.

En Chordais and Kyriakos Kalaitzidis perform music from their March release The Musical Voyages of Marco Polo at The Lincoln Center for the Performing Arts this Thursday! http://ow.ly/tZhZk

The group also performs in NYC on Friday at Alwan for the Arts and Saturday at The Lincoln Center’s Atrium.

Styles, timbres, temperaments and textures of the vocalists couldn’t be more wide-ranging, various and interesting. Some of them shout—field shouts. Nodira Primatova supplicates like a love-lorn banshee in her Uzbek song “Ey Dilbari Jononim.” Maria Farantouri sings the album’s most affecting song, “The Stranger,” in a high, haunting voice of exquisite sensitivity. Amartuvshin Baasandorj’s “Chandmani untag,” a Mongolian style song, is an exotic tour de force because his mouth and hand jive— like Tibetan overtone – harmonic or throat – singing—growls in gritty lower pitches or whistles and whines like a jews harp.

This project is a collaboration between two ensembles: En Chordais, directed by virtuoso oud play player Kyriakos Kalaitzidis, and Constantinople comprising brothers Kiya and Ziya Tabassian (Kiya plays setar, sings and composes, Ziya explores the infinite possibilities of the tombak and other percussion instruments), and Pierre-Yves Martel— a viola da gamba player from Montreal.

There is a whole world of listening here, a generously packaged feast for the ear and the mind. Five Stars.

Coming in March is The Musical Voyages of Marco Polo by En Chordais! The group, led by Kyriakos Kalaitzidis, is on tour now in North America. Check out their schedule: http://ow.ly/tKXDF

Coming in March is The Musical Voyages of Marco Polo by En Chordais! The group, led by Kyriakos Kalaitzidis, is on tour now in North America. Check out their schedule: http://ow.ly/tKXDF

Do you listen to global music, roots or jazz? Be a fan of World Village on Facebook and get updates on our new releases, tour dates and more! 

Do you listen to global music, roots or jazz? Be a fan of World Village on Facebook and get updates on our new releases, tour dates and more! 

Terakaft brings a stripped-down tuareg sound - Chicago Tribune
"…"The first thing for me with the electric guitar, and it’s probably true for the Tuareg people, is the power of the sound," Ahmed said. "I understood at once how far the sound of a guitar could go throughout the desert."
Ablil and Ahmed realized how that sound could transform customary Tuareg instrumental roles.
"This style of guitar is called ‘assouf,’ and it means nostalgia," Ablil said. "It’s a mix of modern new discoveries with the guitar and more ancient ways of playing the instrument. The ancient music is called ‘tinde.’ It’s traditionally played by women and it’s played with percussion. We’ve taken that rhythmic information and brought it out on guitar."
Ahmed adds that Terakaft adapt other older Tuareg instruments and musical ideas they’ve heard during their journeys across North Africa.
"We’ve brought the imzad (a kind of Tuareg violin) to our modern music," Ahmed said. "Some of our musical phrases sometimes have a more Arabic or Andalusian origin than Tuareg. We have been traveling throughout Algeria and Libya, so their music has an influence on what we play…"
When: 8 p.m., Saturday
Where: Old Town School of Folk Music, 4545 N. Lincoln Ave.
Tickets: $20-$22; 773-728-6000 or oldtownschool.org”

Terakaft brings a stripped-down tuareg sound - Chicago Tribune

"…"The first thing for me with the electric guitar, and it’s probably true for the Tuareg people, is the power of the sound," Ahmed said. "I understood at once how far the sound of a guitar could go throughout the desert."

Ablil and Ahmed realized how that sound could transform customary Tuareg instrumental roles.

"This style of guitar is called ‘assouf,’ and it means nostalgia," Ablil said. "It’s a mix of modern new discoveries with the guitar and more ancient ways of playing the instrument. The ancient music is called ‘tinde.’ It’s traditionally played by women and it’s played with percussion. We’ve taken that rhythmic information and brought it out on guitar."

Ahmed adds that Terakaft adapt other older Tuareg instruments and musical ideas they’ve heard during their journeys across North Africa.

"We’ve brought the imzad (a kind of Tuareg violin) to our modern music," Ahmed said. "Some of our musical phrases sometimes have a more Arabic or Andalusian origin than Tuareg. We have been traveling throughout Algeria and Libya, so their music has an influence on what we play…"

When: 8 p.m., Saturday

Where: Old Town School of Folk Music, 4545 N. Lincoln Ave.

Tickets: $20-$22; 773-728-6000 or oldtownschool.org”

Emel Mathlouthi interviewed by MTV IGGY:   “As long as I sing in Arabic, my music is going to be considered world music…The people who like world music are going to expect traditional, acoustic stuff. The people who like electronic music are not expecting all of these instruments around, so I am in the middle of these two things. But I like to surprise.”

Emel Mathlouthi interviewed by MTV IGGY

“As long as I sing in Arabic, my music is going to be considered world music…The people who like world music are going to expect traditional, acoustic stuff. The people who like electronic music are not expecting all of these instruments around, so I am in the middle of these two things. But I like to surprise.”