Terakaft at The Chicago Cultural Center (by GYATBookings)

Terakaft hits SXSW today!

March 14 - Austin Psych Fest at Hotel Vegas - 2pm

March 14 - Austin Angers Music at Bungalow - 11pm

March 15 - Austin Angers Psych Day at Justine’s - 1pm

March 15 - globalFEST at Speakeasy - 10:30pm

March 16 - International Day Stage at Convention Center - 2pm

March 16 - Nat Geo Music at The Stage on 6th Patio - 12am

(via Pencil This In: Terakaft At Chicago Cultural Center: Chicagoist)
"Fans of the Desert blues of Tinariwen should make a beeline to the Chicago Cultural Center March 12 for Terakaft. Like Tinariwen, Terakaft (Tamasheq for "caravan") mines that same hypnotic, guitar-focused trancelike music that brings the North African desert to your speakers. The 12-year-old band is only now starting to find an audience outside of Africa and are on their first U.S. tour. Tomorrow’s 6:30 p.m. concert marks their Chicago debut. (78 E. Washington; Preston Bradley Hall; free.)”

(via Pencil This In: Terakaft At Chicago Cultural Center: Chicagoist)

"Fans of the Desert blues of Tinariwen should make a beeline to the Chicago Cultural Center March 12 for Terakaft. Like Tinariwen, Terakaft (Tamasheq for "caravan") mines that same hypnotic, guitar-focused trancelike music that brings the North African desert to your speakers. The 12-year-old band is only now starting to find an audience outside of Africa and are on their first U.S. tour. Tomorrow’s 6:30 p.m. concert marks their Chicago debut. (78 E. Washington; Preston Bradley Hall; free.)”

(via Terakaft | Preston Bradley Hall, Chicago Cultural Center | International | Chicago Reader)
"Mesmerizing north African guitar band Terakaft named their fourth and best record, Kel Tamasheq [on iTunes]…Adams has brought a new clarity to the cycling guitar licks and stabs, clopping percussion, and syncopated hand claps, and he joins some folks from Maghreb-influenced French band Lo’Jo to contribute extra guitar and background vocals. But that’s not to say the four members of Terakaft need help—they’re a seasoned unit, driving their arid grooves and nasal incantations with an implacable sense of purpose.”
When: Tue., March 12, 6:30 p.m.
Preston Bradley Hall, Chicago Cultural Center
78 E. Washington St. Loop
312-744-6630

(via Terakaft | Preston Bradley Hall, Chicago Cultural Center | International | Chicago Reader)

"Mesmerizing north African guitar band Terakaft named their fourth and best record, Kel Tamasheq [on iTunes]…Adams has brought a new clarity to the cycling guitar licks and stabs, clopping percussion, and syncopated hand claps, and he joins some folks from Maghreb-influenced French band Lo’Jo to contribute extra guitar and background vocals. But that’s not to say the four members of Terakaft need help—they’re a seasoned unit, driving their arid grooves and nasal incantations with an implacable sense of purpose.”

When: Tue., March 12, 6:30 p.m.

Preston Bradley Hall, Chicago Cultural Center

  • 78 E. Washington St. Loop
  • phone312-744-6630
Antonio Zambujo in the Chicago Reader

"…there are many great male singers and António Zambujo, one of the best and most ascendant contemporary artists, makes his Chicago debut tonight in a free concert at the Chicago Cultural Center.

…On his fantastic fourth album Guia (World Village, 2010) he demonstrates a mastery of the style’s fundamental sound—a demonstrative delivery dripping with pathos amid a sweet weave of guitars (a standard acoustic guitar and the higher-pitched, chiming Portuguese guitar)—but he also freely moves outside of it. On some tunes he employs instruments rarely encountered in fado—tuba, dobro, clarinet, trombone, trumpet (Zambujo’s singing owes a noticeable debt to the soft focus croon of Chet Baker), and, on “A Tua Frieza Gela,” sound sculptures—and he artfully blends in elements of Brazilian pop music and even Cape Verdean mornas.

Zambujo grew up in Beja, in the country’s south, where he absorbed one of Portugal’s lesser-known traditions—Cante Alentejano, a polyphonic vocal style that bears similarities to traditions in Sardinia, Corsica, and Albania. On the singer’s excellent 2004 album Por Meu Cante (recently reissued by World Village) he concludes with a couple of excursions into this gripping a cappella form. All of his recordings, including Guia, find him reaching out beyond the strictures of fado like this; on the new record he sings a couple of tunes written by the great young Brazilian artist Rodrigo Maranhäo, who’s provided songs for Maria Rita and made a couple of terrific albums of his own, while a piece like “Zorro” sounds like a misty samba. And as you can hear in “Barroco Tropical,” below, he serves up his own fado-tinged morna—the ballad style made famous by Cesaria Evora—rippling with figures played on the sweet-toned cavaquinho.” (link)