wyceradio:

WYCE 881 ESSENTIALS - LUCKY PETERSON

Lucky Peterson was born in Buffalo New York and played his first gig at age three. By the time he was five, he had already recorded his first single, produced by none other than the legendary Willie Dixon. Before Lucky turned six, his career had been propelled into the national spotlight with television appearances on The Ed Sullivan Show, The Tonight Show with Johnny Carson and even What’s My Line? WYCE’s recommended essential listening is “Tin Pan Alley” from the album Move.

Lucky Peterson’s new album The Son of a Bluesman is coming out on Jazz Village in June!

(via Bibi Tanga, “Now” • Afropop Worldwide)
Pre-order Now, out May 13 in the US! http://ow.ly/w0vDH
"…Tanga produced Now on his own, ensuring that his musical vision isn’t diluted in any way. That vision is ripe with inventiveness and a throwback ’70s style that still sounds fresh for 21st century ears. While many albums are front-loaded with the best material leading into filler, Now keeps sounding better and better, as if Tanga is gaining momentum as he goes along. Musically, the album is full of energy and sincere soulfulness, and while many of the lyrics deal with the unpleasant realities of war in his native land, Tanga never loses his uplifting spirit. On “Ngambe,” which begins with the sound of gunfire, Tanga sings “You play with guns to kill people/I play music to save people.”
Some of Now’s highlights in the funk and soul genres include “Upset,” a disco-funk track that is one of those rare songs that is just as heartfelt as it is ready for the dancefloor. The title track and “With You” are straight-up Al Green-style soul tracks, while “Now” also showcases Tanga’s funky bass playing. “Money Honey” sounds somewhere between P Funk and Frank Zappa– a mixture as thrilling as it looks on paper.
However, Now is just as much about the CAR and Tanga’s upbringing as it is about keeping alive the great sounds of decades past. The musical tradition of Central African Republic is present on Now, for instance in the song “Monteguene,” named after a rhythm played in the country’s Lobaye region. That rhythm has a stop-and-start quality that both stands out from other styles on the album and makes it immediately infectious. On “War,” Tanga raps, “We think we brave, but we digging our own grave” over a beat that wouldn’t sound out of place on a Devin the Dude album. Tonga, who grew up listening to the gospel singer Ella Jenkins, brings the influence of spirituals on “Who’s Gonna Be Your Man,” with harmonized singing of “Oh lordy me/Who’s going to be your man?”…

(via Bibi Tanga, “Now” • Afropop Worldwide)

Pre-order Now, out May 13 in the US! http://ow.ly/w0vDH

"…Tanga produced Now on his own, ensuring that his musical vision isn’t diluted in any way. That vision is ripe with inventiveness and a throwback ’70s style that still sounds fresh for 21st century ears. While many albums are front-loaded with the best material leading into filler, Now keeps sounding better and better, as if Tanga is gaining momentum as he goes along. Musically, the album is full of energy and sincere soulfulness, and while many of the lyrics deal with the unpleasant realities of war in his native land, Tanga never loses his uplifting spirit. On “Ngambe,” which begins with the sound of gunfire, Tanga sings “You play with guns to kill people/I play music to save people.”

Some of Now’s highlights in the funk and soul genres include “Upset,” a disco-funk track that is one of those rare songs that is just as heartfelt as it is ready for the dancefloor. The title track and “With You” are straight-up Al Green-style soul tracks, while “Now” also showcases Tanga’s funky bass playing. “Money Honey” sounds somewhere between P Funk and Frank Zappa– a mixture as thrilling as it looks on paper.

However, Now is just as much about the CAR and Tanga’s upbringing as it is about keeping alive the great sounds of decades past. The musical tradition of Central African Republic is present on Now, for instance in the song “Monteguene,” named after a rhythm played in the country’s Lobaye region. That rhythm has a stop-and-start quality that both stands out from other styles on the album and makes it immediately infectious. On “War,” Tanga raps, “We think we brave, but we digging our own grave” over a beat that wouldn’t sound out of place on a Devin the Dude album. Tonga, who grew up listening to the gospel singer Ella Jenkins, brings the influence of spirituals on “Who’s Gonna Be Your Man,” with harmonized singing of “Oh lordy me/Who’s going to be your man?”…

(via The weekend in NWA live music from April 18-20 | TunedIn)
Catherine Russell’s concert at Sheldon Concert Hall tomorrow is a Best Bet in The St. Louis Post-Dispatch (along with Aziz Ansari)! http://ow.ly/vVETN
Catherine is also featured on NWA Tuned In (above) for her Walton Arts Center shows tonight in Fayetteville, AR.

(via The weekend in NWA live music from April 18-20 | TunedIn)

Catherine Russell’s concert at Sheldon Concert Hall tomorrow is a Best Bet in The St. Louis Post-Dispatch (along with Aziz Ansari)! http://ow.ly/vVETN

Catherine is also featured on NWA Tuned In (above) for her Walton Arts Center shows tonight in Fayetteville, AR.

(via St. Louis Jazz Notes: StLJN Saturday Video Showcase: In the tradition with Catherine Russell)

"Today, let’s get acquainted with singer Catherine Russell, who will be making her St. Louis debut as a headliner next Saturday, April 19 at the Sheldon Concert Hall.

Russell is from New York, born in 1956 to Luis Russell, a pianist, composer and longtime bandleader for Louis Armstrong, and Carline Ray, a bassist and vocalist who performed with Mary Lou Williams and the International Sweethearts of Rhythm.

While she’s been active in the music business for many years, Russell’s career as a solo artist took a while to blossom. Before releasing her debut album Cat in 2002, she earned a living as an in-demand backup singer on tours and recordings with major artists including Steely Dan, Levon Helm, David Bowie, Cyndi Lauper, Paul Simon, Jackson Browne, Michael Feinstein, Carrie Smith, and Rosanne Cash.

Though she’s held on to some of those gigs - even getting a feature spot in the show on recent tours of the Dukes of September (Steely Dan’s Donald Fagen, Michael McDonald, and Boz Scaggs) - her solo career has grown to occupy more and more of her time. Since her debut, Russell has released four more albums, the most recent of which, Bring It Back, came out in February on the Jazz Village label, and in 2012 won a Grammy Award for her appearance as a featured artist on the soundtrack album for the HBO series Boardwalk Empire…”

Click through for more great videos of Catherine!

(via Atlanta Jazz Festival Ahmad Jamal)
Ahmad Jamal performs at the Atlanta Jazz Festival on May 25! The festival is free, at Piedmont Park.

(via Atlanta Jazz Festival Ahmad Jamal)

Ahmad Jamal performs at the Atlanta Jazz Festival on May 25! The festival is free, at Piedmont Park.

Out now on Jazz Village.

Natalia M. King - “I’ve Changed” (Live Acoustic Version) [“Soulblazz” 2014] (by JazzVillageMusic)

Out now in the U.S. on Jazz Village: Natalia M. KING’s SoulBLAZZ!

Get the album on iTunes: http://ow.ly/uXQLo or Amazon: http://ow.ly/uXQSA

"Another schedule highlight is provided by singer Catherine Russell, who is at Knuckleheads on Wednesday [April 16]…If you go to YouTube, you can hear her sing some tasty swing tunes with Jazz at Lincoln Center bands” -The Kansas City Star
Also a Top Show in Ink Magazine: http://ow.ly/vEob4

"Another schedule highlight is provided by singer Catherine Russell, who is at Knuckleheads on Wednesday [April 16]…If you go to YouTube, you can hear her sing some tasty swing tunes with Jazz at Lincoln Center bands” -The Kansas City Star

Also a Top Show in Ink Magazinehttp://ow.ly/vEob4

(via Pasadena Weekly - Trax 040314)
"NATALIA M. KING, SoulBlazz (Jazz Village): (4.5 stars out of 5) The former Angeleno claims Nina Simone, Thelonious Monk and Janis Joplin as musical forebears, and there’s more than a whisper of Billie Holiday in her yearning “soulblazz.” Long since decamped to Paris, she’s supported by a nimble French ensemble of harmonica, Rhodes organ, saxophone, slide guitar and trumpet. Her evocative alto caresses the bass-and-sax cadences of Sam Cooke’s “Today I Sing the Blues” ’til it smokes, but the album’s fired by poetic, bared-heart originals: “Lady of the Night,” “I Need to See You Again,” “I’ve Changed,” “Stronger Than I.” nataliamking.com”
SoulBLAZZ is out tomorrow! iTunes: http://ow.ly/uXQLo Amazon: http://ow.ly/uXQSA

(via Pasadena Weekly - Trax 040314)

"NATALIA M. KING, SoulBlazz (Jazz Village): (4.5 stars out of 5)
The former Angeleno claims Nina Simone, Thelonious Monk and Janis Joplin as musical forebears, and there’s more than a whisper of Billie Holiday in her yearning “soulblazz.” Long since decamped to Paris, she’s supported by a nimble French ensemble of harmonica, Rhodes organ, saxophone, slide guitar and trumpet. Her evocative alto caresses the bass-and-sax cadences of Sam Cooke’s “Today I Sing the Blues” ’til it smokes, but the album’s fired by poetic, bared-heart originals: “Lady of the Night,” “I Need to See You Again,” “I’ve Changed,” “Stronger Than I.” nataliamking.com”

SoulBLAZZ is out tomorrow! iTunes: http://ow.ly/uXQLo Amazon: http://ow.ly/uXQSA

(via SoundStage! Ultra | Catherine Russell: “Bring It Back” - Recording of the Month)
"…My generation knows of “The Darktown Strutters’ Ball” because, in 1969, The Band quoted from its lyrics on the back cover of their second album, The Band. Published in 1917, Shelton Brooks’s tune has been widely recorded, but Russell and her band polish it up with a warm blues arrangement enlivened by Matt Munisteri’s cool, unfussy guitar solo. Russell sounds like she’s having a ball singing this old chestnut, and her enthusiasm makes the song new again. Her gift to us, and to all these old tunes, is to let us feel the joy people hearing them for the first time must have felt.
Al Hibbler’s version of “After the Light Go Down Low” was a hit in 1956, and Glenn Patscha’s Hammond B-3 gives Russell’s turn at it a jukebox feel. The track is presented simply — just organ, guitar, bass, and drums — and Russell grabs hold of the tune with unforced conviction. Her control of vocal dynamics lets her create excitement and drama without pushing too hard to make her point. The gospel vibe of “I’m Sticking With You Baby” might have been easily overdone, but Russell sings it with a spirit and emotion that are clearly heartfelt.
The affection of Russell’s band for older jazz is clear — they play it with energy and respect. Arranger and tenor saxophonist Andy Farber, whose own discs are solid big-band outings, re-creates a 1930s jazz feel for “I’m Shooting High,” and his chart for Duke Ellington’s “I Let a Song Go Out of My Heart” pays respect to swing-era Ellington without merely copying him. HBO’s Prohibition-era series Boardwalk Empire has used Russell’s music in its soundtrack, and she and her band have a broad command of jazz and blues that lets them play Ida Cox’s “You Got to Swing and Sway,” from 1939, with the same ease as Johnny Otis’s 1952 hit for Esther Phillips, “Aged and Mellow…”

(via SoundStage! Ultra | Catherine Russell: “Bring It Back” - Recording of the Month)

"…My generation knows of “The Darktown Strutters’ Ball” because, in 1969, The Band quoted from its lyrics on the back cover of their second album, The Band. Published in 1917, Shelton Brooks’s tune has been widely recorded, but Russell and her band polish it up with a warm blues arrangement enlivened by Matt Munisteri’s cool, unfussy guitar solo. Russell sounds like she’s having a ball singing this old chestnut, and her enthusiasm makes the song new again. Her gift to us, and to all these old tunes, is to let us feel the joy people hearing them for the first time must have felt.

Al Hibbler’s version of “After the Light Go Down Low” was a hit in 1956, and Glenn Patscha’s Hammond B-3 gives Russell’s turn at it a jukebox feel. The track is presented simply — just organ, guitar, bass, and drums — and Russell grabs hold of the tune with unforced conviction. Her control of vocal dynamics lets her create excitement and drama without pushing too hard to make her point. The gospel vibe of “I’m Sticking With You Baby” might have been easily overdone, but Russell sings it with a spirit and emotion that are clearly heartfelt.

The affection of Russell’s band for older jazz is clear — they play it with energy and respect. Arranger and tenor saxophonist Andy Farber, whose own discs are solid big-band outings, re-creates a 1930s jazz feel for “I’m Shooting High,” and his chart for Duke Ellington’s “I Let a Song Go Out of My Heart” pays respect to swing-era Ellington without merely copying him. HBO’s Prohibition-era series Boardwalk Empire has used Russell’s music in its soundtrack, and she and her band have a broad command of jazz and blues that lets them play Ida Cox’s “You Got to Swing and Sway,” from 1939, with the same ease as Johnny Otis’s 1952 hit for Esther Phillips, “Aged and Mellow…”