(via Sundays in the Redwoods – Magic In The Music)
Kyle Eastwood plays Sundays in the Redwoods in Oakland, CA on September 21!The View From Here is available on iTunes: http://ow.ly/AseEL Amazon: http://ow.ly/AseLX

(via Sundays in the Redwoods – Magic In The Music)

Kyle Eastwood plays Sundays in the Redwoods in Oakland, CA on September 21!

The View From Here is available on iTunes: http://ow.ly/AseEL Amazon: http://ow.ly/AseLX

Kyle Eastwood's 6-night residency at Blue Note Jazz Club with The Larry Carlton Group starts tomorrow!

Kyle Eastwood's 6-night residency at Blue Note Jazz Club with The Larry Carlton Group starts tomorrow!

(via Sound Check: Kyle Eastwood active in film, with quartet)
"Being the son of Clint Eastwood has its perks — not only a tremendous grounding in jazz and a great record collection to be influenced by, but also the chance to work on his films.
Kyle Eastwood has, in fact, worked on the music for several of his father’s movies, including “Million Dollar Baby” and the Detroit-filmed “Gran Torino.” And he’s just wrapped up another high-profile job in the big screen adaptation of the stage hit “Jersey Boys.”
“Most of the music is Four Seasons songs; I was just doing some of the score under the sort of dramatic scenes and things like that,” says Eastwood, 45, who resides in Paris. “One of the pieces I did sounds kind of like a reprise of one of their things, but mostly it’s just piano and strings and kind of more dramatic themes that you need for a film but not always for a stage show.
“I have a pretty good idea of what (his dad) likes and how he likes to work; I’ve grown up watching him work and I think I have a pretty good idea of what he’s looking for. But he’s also very open, so it gives you a lot of creative freedom to come up with something and impress him.”
Eastwood maintains a thriving artistic career, of course, with six albums since 1998 — including last year’s “The View From Here.” A new album is looming, most likely starting in June, when Eastwood returns to Paris for a jazz festival there…
Kyle Eastwood and his quintet perform at 6 and 8:30 p.m. Friday and Saturday, March 21-22, at the Dirty Dog Jazz Cafe, 97 Kercheval, Grosse Pointe. Cover is $40. Call 313-882-5299 or visit www.dirtydogjazz.com.”

(via Sound Check: Kyle Eastwood active in film, with quartet)

"Being the son of Clint Eastwood has its perks — not only a tremendous grounding in jazz and a great record collection to be influenced by, but also the chance to work on his films.

Kyle Eastwood has, in fact, worked on the music for several of his father’s movies, including “Million Dollar Baby” and the Detroit-filmed “Gran Torino.” And he’s just wrapped up another high-profile job in the big screen adaptation of the stage hit “Jersey Boys.”

“Most of the music is Four Seasons songs; I was just doing some of the score under the sort of dramatic scenes and things like that,” says Eastwood, 45, who resides in Paris. “One of the pieces I did sounds kind of like a reprise of one of their things, but mostly it’s just piano and strings and kind of more dramatic themes that you need for a film but not always for a stage show.

“I have a pretty good idea of what (his dad) likes and how he likes to work; I’ve grown up watching him work and I think I have a pretty good idea of what he’s looking for. But he’s also very open, so it gives you a lot of creative freedom to come up with something and impress him.”

Eastwood maintains a thriving artistic career, of course, with six albums since 1998 — including last year’s “The View From Here.” A new album is looming, most likely starting in June, when Eastwood returns to Paris for a jazz festival there…

Kyle Eastwood and his quintet perform at 6 and 8:30 p.m. Friday and Saturday, March 21-22, at the Dirty Dog Jazz Cafe, 97 Kercheval, Grosse Pointe. Cover is $40. Call 313-882-5299 or visit www.dirtydogjazz.com.”

(via Clint Eastwood’s son — a film composer and bassist — plays in… | www.mypalmbeachpost.com)
"The bass doesn’t seem like the star of a jazz quartet, giving way to the flashier and more portable trumpet or saxophone. But Kyle Eastwood knows better.
“I have always loved drum and bass, because it’s the rhythm section I’m most interested in,” says Eastwood, a noted musician and film composer. “I think people don’t realize how important it is, because it encompasses both worlds. The bass changes the whole timbre and feel of the chords of what you happen to be playing…”
Kyle Eastwood on tour this week!
Tomorrow - Jazziz Nightlife - Boca Raton, FL Wednesday - University of North Alabama (benefit show) - Florence, AL Fri & Sat - Dirty Dog Jazz Cafe - Grosse Pointe Farms, MI Sun - Bethesda Blues & Jazz Supper Club - Bethesda, MD
And 3/25-30 - Blue Note Jazz Club, NY - NYC

(via Clint Eastwood’s son — a film composer and bassist — plays in… | www.mypalmbeachpost.com)

"The bass doesn’t seem like the star of a jazz quartet, giving way to the flashier and more portable trumpet or saxophone. But Kyle Eastwood knows better.

“I have always loved drum and bass, because it’s the rhythm section I’m most interested in,” says Eastwood, a noted musician and film composer. “I think people don’t realize how important it is, because it encompasses both worlds. The bass changes the whole timbre and feel of the chords of what you happen to be playing…”

Kyle Eastwood on tour this week!

Tomorrow - Jazziz Nightlife - Boca Raton, FL
Wednesday - University of North Alabama (benefit show) - Florence, AL
Fri & Sat - Dirty Dog Jazz Cafe - Grosse Pointe Farms, MI
Sun - Bethesda Blues & Jazz Supper Club - Bethesda, MD

And 3/25-30 - Blue Note Jazz Club, NY - NYC

(via Kyle Eastwood to play Jazziz in Boca Raton | City & Shore Magazine)

"The last songs Kyle Eastwood downloaded from iTunes – music by ’50s and ’60s jazz pianist Wynton Kelly and by French electronic music sensation Daft Punk – say a lot about the bassist/composer.

Eastwood, 45, whose surname and variation-on-a-theme visage come from his father, Clint Eastwood, blends traditional jazz with worldwide contemporary influences in his music – which he and his band bring to Jazziz in Boca Raton on March 18. The legendary actor/director/composer’s son inherited his dad’s love of jazz, making a name for himself as a composer and musician, with six albums to date.

He started piano lessons at age 6, took up guitar at 12 for a role in the Eastwood film Honkytonk Man, then fell in love with the bass line – “the rhythm of a band” – and learned the acoustic and electric bass as well as the double bass. He has worked on the scores for eight of his father’s films, including Million Dollar Baby, Invictus and Gran Torino.

Based in Paris, Eastwood has been in Los Angeles since November, working on the underscore for the Clint Eastwood-directed Jersey Boys (expected June 20). We caught up with him a few weeks before the Kyle Eastwood Band’s U.S. tour, which includes 16 dates in 18 days in 10 locales across the country.

Do you enjoy the frenetic pace of touring?

It’s fun. Your energy gets up, and playing every night is great for your chops. The band really comes together.

What can Jazziz patrons expect? 

We’re going to play music from my last four or five albums. The musicians are all really great players I’ve known and played with over the years in my band and other bands, all out of New York. They’re really good, young players, so there’s a lot of energy. We should be really cooking by the time we get to Florida…”

(via Kyle Eastwood to play Jazziz in Boca Raton | City & Shore Magazine)

"The last songs Kyle Eastwood downloaded from iTunes – music by ’50s and ’60s jazz pianist Wynton Kelly and by French electronic music sensation Daft Punk – say a lot about the bassist/composer.

Eastwood, 45, whose surname and variation-on-a-theme visage come from his father, Clint Eastwood, blends traditional jazz with worldwide contemporary influences in his music – which he and his band bring to Jazziz in Boca Raton on March 18. The legendary actor/director/composer’s son inherited his dad’s love of jazz, making a name for himself as a composer and musician, with six albums to date.

He started piano lessons at age 6, took up guitar at 12 for a role in the Eastwood film Honkytonk Man, then fell in love with the bass line – “the rhythm of a band” – and learned the acoustic and electric bass as well as the double bass. He has worked on the scores for eight of his father’s films, including Million Dollar Baby, Invictus and Gran Torino.

Based in Paris, Eastwood has been in Los Angeles since November, working on the underscore for the Clint Eastwood-directed Jersey Boys (expected June 20). We caught up with him a few weeks before the Kyle Eastwood Band’s U.S. tour, which includes 16 dates in 18 days in 10 locales across the country.

Do you enjoy the frenetic pace of touring?

It’s fun. Your energy gets up, and playing every night is great for your chops. The band really comes together.

What can Jazziz patrons expect?

We’re going to play music from my last four or five albums. The musicians are all really great players I’ve known and played with over the years in my band and other bands, all out of New York. They’re really good, young players, so there’s a lot of energy. We should be really cooking by the time we get to Florida…”

(via Kyle Eastwood Was A Ten Year Old Jazz Club Regular)

"Bassist Kyle Eastwood grew up immersed in the world of jazz. The classic sounds of Miles Davis and John Coltrane filled his home as a child and his father, legendary actor Clint Eastwood, introduced him to many of the genre’s greatest practitioners before he was old enough for middle school. Between breaks on a film scoring session, the younger Eastwood spoke with the Weekly about that path to becoming a globally-recognized commander of the upright and electric bass. He will be appearing with his band this Saturday at Spaghettini in Seal Beach.
OC Weekly (Sean J. O’Connell): When did you take up the bass?

Kyle Eastwood: The first time I picked up the bass was when I was 13 or 14. I was in high school. I had a lot of friends who were musicians and they were always looking for a bassist. I studied piano and a little guitar first but I knew mostly guitarists and horn players. Luckily it came naturally to me.

Did you gravitate to upright or electric first?

I started on electric. At 18 I switched to acoustic and I focused on that for a few years before I went back to electric. I like playing both. It’s nice to get different sounds and different colors. I spent a few years just playing acoustic but then I missed the electric sometimes. I had to split my time on both instruments.

Who were your initial influences musically?

I was really into Paul Chambers, transcribing his bass lines and solos. I got slowly into the old school guys like Oscar Pettiford, Jimmy Blanton and Slam Stewart. When I first started playing I was learning Motown tunes so lots of James Jamerson. All the funk bass players. I listened to a lot of James Brown…”

(via Kyle Eastwood Was A Ten Year Old Jazz Club Regular)

"Bassist Kyle Eastwood grew up immersed in the world of jazz. The classic sounds of Miles Davis and John Coltrane filled his home as a child and his father, legendary actor Clint Eastwood, introduced him to many of the genre’s greatest practitioners before he was old enough for middle school. Between breaks on a film scoring session, the younger Eastwood spoke with the Weekly about that path to becoming a globally-recognized commander of the upright and electric bass. He will be appearing with his band this Saturday at Spaghettini in Seal Beach.
OC Weekly (Sean J. O’Connell): When did you take up the bass?

Kyle Eastwood: The first time I picked up the bass was when I was 13 or 14. I was in high school. I had a lot of friends who were musicians and they were always looking for a bassist. I studied piano and a little guitar first but I knew mostly guitarists and horn players. Luckily it came naturally to me.

Did you gravitate to upright or electric first?

I started on electric. At 18 I switched to acoustic and I focused on that for a few years before I went back to electric. I like playing both. It’s nice to get different sounds and different colors. I spent a few years just playing acoustic but then I missed the electric sometimes. I had to split my time on both instruments.

Who were your initial influences musically?

I was really into Paul Chambers, transcribing his bass lines and solos. I got slowly into the old school guys like Oscar Pettiford, Jimmy Blanton and Slam Stewart. When I first started playing I was learning Motown tunes so lots of James Jamerson. All the funk bass players. I listened to a lot of James Brown…”

(via Kyle Eastwood: Jazz musician talks film scores, Florence benefit, music he and dad Clint Eastwood didn’t see eye-to-eye on | AL.com)

"For bassist and film-score composer Kyle Eastwood, jazz is more than a museum – it’s a malleable form. Eastwood’s sixth album "The View From Here" infuses the idiom’s familiar aesthetics with Cuban and North African rhythms and Middle Eastern scales. "All the things I listen to show up in the stuff I write," Eastwood, 45, says. "I’ve always grown up listening to jazz, but liked all different kinds of music – R&B and Motown and soul music as well as a lot of music for films and music from all different countries."

Eastwood is the son of actor/director Clint Eastwood. Kyle has contributed music to several of his father’s films, including composing scores (with musical partner Michael Stevens) for “Invictus,” “Grand Torino” and “Letters from Iwo Jima.” Kyle’s music also appears in others film including “Mystic River.” It’s a pretty brilliant situation. A son gets to work with a famous father without constantly getting compared to his dad. But it begs the questions: When Kyle’s working on music for a Clint Eastwood film, does Clint come to him requesting exacting atmosphere or does he just leave the music entirely up to Kyle?…”

(via Kyle Eastwood: Jazz musician talks film scores, Florence benefit, music he and dad Clint Eastwood didn’t see eye-to-eye on | AL.com)

"For bassist and film-score composer Kyle Eastwood, jazz is more than a museum – it’s a malleable form. Eastwood’s sixth album "The View From Here" infuses the idiom’s familiar aesthetics with Cuban and North African rhythms and Middle Eastern scales. "All the things I listen to show up in the stuff I write," Eastwood, 45, says. "I’ve always grown up listening to jazz, but liked all different kinds of music – R&B and Motown and soul music as well as a lot of music for films and music from all different countries."

Eastwood is the son of actor/director Clint Eastwood. Kyle has contributed music to several of his father’s films, including composing scores (with musical partner Michael Stevens) for “Invictus,” “Grand Torino” and “Letters from Iwo Jima.” Kyle’s music also appears in others film including “Mystic River.” It’s a pretty brilliant situation. A son gets to work with a famous father without constantly getting compared to his dad. But it begs the questions: When Kyle’s working on music for a Clint Eastwood film, does Clint come to him requesting exacting atmosphere or does he just leave the music entirely up to Kyle?…”

(via Upcoming jazz shows: Kyle Eastwood, Charlap Trio are fine bets - The Denver Post)

"The highest-profile shows of the week will begin to happen before we get around to the weekend. There’s plenty of virtuosity to take in with these two artists:

Kyle Eastwood — March 12, Mount Vernon Country Club: It’s encouraging news that Golden’s Mount Vernon Country Club is staging new jazz concerts in 2014, after being relatively quiet last year. Yes, bassist-composer Eastwood is the son of filmmaker-actor-jazz lover Clint, and began his show-business career acting alongside his father in 1982’s bittersweet, country music-themed film, “Honkytonk Man.” In recent years, the younger Eastwood seems to prefer to be on the other side of the camera, scoring numerous motion pictures and occasionally releasing a jazz disc.

What does Eastwood’s jazz music sound like? Much of it, like 2013’s “The View From Here,” comes off as personable and accomplished. Eastwood combines globally tinged themes (to my ears, Eastwood grew up paying close attention to the Argentine composer Lalo Schifrin, who supplied soundtracks to several ’70s Clint Eastwood films) with laid-back modern jazz. The overall effect can be pleasantly slick, but with too many ideas and nods to tradition to be classified as “smooth.”

Dinner is available before the 8 p.m. concert. Find out more at mountvernoncc.com.”

(via Upcoming jazz shows: Kyle Eastwood, Charlap Trio are fine bets - The Denver Post)

"The highest-profile shows of the week will begin to happen before we get around to the weekend. There’s plenty of virtuosity to take in with these two artists:

Kyle Eastwood — March 12, Mount Vernon Country Club: It’s encouraging news that Golden’s Mount Vernon Country Club is staging new jazz concerts in 2014, after being relatively quiet last year. Yes, bassist-composer Eastwood is the son of filmmaker-actor-jazz lover Clint, and began his show-business career acting alongside his father in 1982’s bittersweet, country music-themed film, “Honkytonk Man.” In recent years, the younger Eastwood seems to prefer to be on the other side of the camera, scoring numerous motion pictures and occasionally releasing a jazz disc.

What does Eastwood’s jazz music sound like? Much of it, like 2013’s “The View From Here,” comes off as personable and accomplished. Eastwood combines globally tinged themes (to my ears, Eastwood grew up paying close attention to the Argentine composer Lalo Schifrin, who supplied soundtracks to several ’70s Clint Eastwood films) with laid-back modern jazz. The overall effect can be pleasantly slick, but with too many ideas and nods to tradition to be classified as “smooth.”

Dinner is available before the 8 p.m. concert. Find out more at mountvernoncc.com.”

March 18 at 7 p.m. & 9 p.m.
Kyle Eastwood
It has been 15 years since bassist Kyle Eastwood burst onto the jazz scene with his 1998 debut, From There To Here. At that moment in his budding career, the press seemed more preoccupied with his paternal lineage (he’s the son of famed actor-director Clint Eastwood) than his music. Over the course of the four subsequent releases – 2004’s Paris Blue, 2005’s Now, 2009’s Metropolitan and 2011’s Songs from the Chateau – Eastwood built up an impressive body of work while earning respect in musician circles. With his sixth release as a leader, The View From Here on the JazzVillage label, he demonstrates a strong command of both electric and upright basses while expanding into more adventurous territory that is informed as much by jazz as it is by world music. “I’ve always loved music from other countries,” says the Carmel, California native who has resided in Paris for the past eight years. “Living in France, you hear a lot of North African and Middle Eastern music, and you can hear some of those influences on this new recording.”
Tickets are $25 for general admission; $45 for premium and $65 for VIP.