This Friday and Saturday, Lo’Jo plays Globalquerque in Albuquerque, NM! At the National Hispanic Cultural Center: http://ow.ly/BzSXq Sunday, catch them in Phoenix, AZ at The Musical Instrument Museum - MIM: http://ow.ly/BzT7X The new album 310 Lunes is out Oct 14! http://ow.ly/BoYLS lojomusic

This Friday and Saturday, Lo’Jo plays Globalquerque in Albuquerque, NM! At the National Hispanic Cultural Centerhttp://ow.ly/BzSXq 

Sunday, catch them in Phoenix, AZ at The Musical Instrument Museum - MIMhttp://ow.ly/BzT7X 

The new album 310 Lunes is out Oct 14! http://ow.ly/BoYLS lojomusic

For ‪#‎throwbackThursday‬, watch Lo’Jo perform at the Festival de la Pleine Lune in 2009!

Lo’Jo’s new, double-disc album 310 Lunes will be out on October 14! http://ow.ly/BoYLS 

Catch them this month at Globalquerque and Musical Instrument Museum - MIMhttp://ow.ly/BoYUQ lojomusic

(via Local iQ - Globalquerque: It takes a village)
"…This year’s festival, which takes place on Sep. 19 and 20, is indeed difficult to pigeonhole in terms of genre, style or geographic-ethnic focus. Consider acts like Söndörgo, which in the words of band members plays “south Slavic music focused on traditional Serbian and Croatian tunes, mixed with Balkan songs and field recordings from Hungarian music collectors Béla Bartók and Tihamér Vujicsics.” Or the admittedly “unclassifiable” French group Lo’Jo, which plays a diverse blend of French folk music and North African influences. If anything, this festival is eclectic…
Frouge is himself a musician, who got turned on to world music by an early introduction to the fascinating variety of North African sounds — such as those produced by this year’s headliner, Malian guitarist Oumar Konaté. The organizer says he savors the uncertainty of how the festival will unfold.
“Take Lo’Jo for instance: I have no idea how to categorize Lo’Jo,” Frouge said, “but I do know that they have been going strong for three decades now, and are beloved by world music fans for their endless curiosity and musical adventuring…”
Don’t miss Lo’Jo at Globalquerque on Sept 19-20! http://ow.ly/BfQbN

(via Local iQ - Globalquerque: It takes a village)

"…This year’s festival, which takes place on Sep. 19 and 20, is indeed difficult to pigeonhole in terms of genre, style or geographic-ethnic focus. Consider acts like Söndörgo, which in the words of band members plays “south Slavic music focused on traditional Serbian and Croatian tunes, mixed with Balkan songs and field recordings from Hungarian music collectors Béla Bartók and Tihamér Vujicsics.” Or the admittedly “unclassifiable” French group Lo’Jo, which plays a diverse blend of French folk music and North African influences. If anything, this festival is eclectic…

Frouge is himself a musician, who got turned on to world music by an early introduction to the fascinating variety of North African sounds — such as those produced by this year’s headliner, Malian guitarist Oumar Konaté. The organizer says he savors the uncertainty of how the festival will unfold.

“Take Lo’Jo for instance: I have no idea how to categorize Lo’Jo,” Frouge said, “but I do know that they have been going strong for three decades now, and are beloved by world music fans for their endless curiosity and musical adventuring…”

Don’t miss Lo’Jo at Globalquerque on Sept 19-20! http://ow.ly/BfQbN

The enigmatic Lo’Jo performs at Globalquerque on September 19 and 20! http://ow.ly/AsbSH Their new album 310 Lunes is due out in October: a double-disc set with new instrumental versions of the group’s most memorable tracks and a re-release of their very first album, The International Courabou!  lojomusic

The enigmatic Lo’Jo performs at Globalquerque on September 19 and 20! http://ow.ly/AsbSH 

Their new album 310 Lunes is due out in October: a double-disc set with new instrumental versions of the group’s most memorable tracks and a re-release of their very first album, The International Courabou!  lojomusic

Check out a preview of our October release: 310 Lunes, a double-disc set from Lo’jo (lojomusic), celebrating the group’s 32nd year (310 moons)!

The first CD features new instrumental versions of some of the group’s most memorable tracks, arranged by Renaud-Gabriel Pion in the spirit of modern chamber music. The second is a re-release of their very first album, The International Courabou, unobtainable since its confidential debut in 1990.

Lo’Jo is the sort of low-key, warmly contemporary act that suits Johnny D’s perfectly…World Music CRASHarts has again brought to Boston a band that blends old world, European charm and a thoroughly contemporary, “citizens of the world” groove. Denis Péan, lead singer and keyboardist, founded the group with Richard Bourreau (who plays both kora and violin) in Angers, France. Péan’s rough-hewn voice is a delicious counterpoint to the gentler warbling of Yamina and Nadia Nid el Mourid, sisters with an eye on West African traditions. They are rounded out by members Kham Meslien and Baptiste Brondy.

…In thirty years of performing, the French band’s fans and collaborators include Robert Plant, Menwar, Robert Wyatt, Niaz Diasamidze, and Vincent Segal. With time, they have developed a polished vigor. Their music, when I saw them, filled Johnny D’s like a heady but familiar cocktail. Yes, their combinations are non-traditional and bewildering, not to mention enormously fun and a bit weird”

lojomusic:

Lo’Jo USA tour 2014 !
Joe’s Pub [New-York]

Lo’Jo can make music anywhere.

(via Lo’Jo Celebrates 30 Years Of Peace And Music | Texas Public Radio)

"The group called Lo’Jo was started in 1982 in Angers, France. The founders, Denis Pean and Richard Bourreau, continue to remain actively engaged with Richard playing the violin and kora and Denis the singer and keyboardist.

Deirdre Saravia: You live as a collective, right? Is that like hippies?

Denis Pean: Yeah, we have a common house where we invite musicians for residence, to work, to play, to compose in the country side, in the West of France. I see many people coming from any part of the world.

Did you know that as a young child that music was what you were going to do?

No, my parents were not interested in the arts. I began by myself, [as] a teenager. We had an old keyboard in my family house… the first time I touched the instrument, I began to compose something. I never had musical education, after I played with a classical orchestra, I played faggotte [ed. note: Bassoon], and I learned harmony but the first thing I learned by myself.

Were you parents happy about that or did they want you to have some sort of a profession?

No. My parents were farmers and they were afraid about the musician’s life and they couldn’t think it was possible to even have a life. They were very afraid [for me]. My parents changed with time, with me in a good way. I think parents give education to children but sometimes children give education to parents.

You really are a great pacifist, your songs convey the necessity for humans to love each other.

Yes, I think it is the main message in music, to find the way to understand different persons. A good weapon for communication, it’s my way to appreciate differences throughout the world.”

(via Lo’Jo Celebrates 30 Years Of Peace And Music | Texas Public Radio)

"The group called Lo’Jo was started in 1982 in Angers, France. The founders, Denis Pean and Richard Bourreau, continue to remain actively engaged with Richard playing the violin and kora and Denis the singer and keyboardist.

Deirdre Saravia: You live as a collective, right? Is that like hippies?

Denis Pean: Yeah, we have a common house where we invite musicians for residence, to work, to play, to compose in the country side, in the West of France. I see many people coming from any part of the world.

Did you know that as a young child that music was what you were going to do?

No, my parents were not interested in the arts. I began by myself, [as] a teenager. We had an old keyboard in my family house… the first time I touched the instrument, I began to compose something. I never had musical education, after I played with a classical orchestra, I played faggotte [ed. note: Bassoon], and I learned harmony but the first thing I learned by myself.

Were you parents happy about that or did they want you to have some sort of a profession?

No. My parents were farmers and they were afraid about the musician’s life and they couldn’t think it was possible to even have a life. They were very afraid [for me]. My parents changed with time, with me in a good way. I think parents give education to children but sometimes children give education to parents.

You really are a great pacifist, your songs convey the necessity for humans to love each other.

Yes, I think it is the main message in music, to find the way to understand different persons. A good weapon for communication, it’s my way to appreciate differences throughout the world.”

Photos of Lo’Jo at SXSW’s International Day Stage last week. lojomusic

Photos of Lo’Jo at SXSW’s International Day Stage last week. lojomusic

(via SXSW Report | Live music recommendations - KansasCity.com)

"Four bands you should check out, all of whom played inside the Austin Convention Center on Friday afternoon.

Lo’Jo: They’re a six-piece from France, four men and two sisters, and their world-beat music has a heavy North African accent. It’s arranged in drums, guitar, bass, keyboards, melodica, violin, saxophone, kora and a variety of handheld percussive instruments. The lead singer’s voice is deep and resonant, like Leonard Cohen’s. The music is groovy and lively and easy to indulge in, especially when the sisters lay down some lovely harmonies…”

(via SXSW Report | Live music recommendations - KansasCity.com)

"Four bands you should check out, all of whom played inside the Austin Convention Center on Friday afternoon.

Lo’Jo: They’re a six-piece from France, four men and two sisters, and their world-beat music has a heavy North African accent. It’s arranged in drums, guitar, bass, keyboards, melodica, violin, saxophone, kora and a variety of handheld percussive instruments. The lead singer’s voice is deep and resonant, like Leonard Cohen’s. The music is groovy and lively and easy to indulge in, especially when the sisters lay down some lovely harmonies…”