(via Bibi Tanga, “Now” • Afropop Worldwide)
Pre-order Now, out May 13 in the US! http://ow.ly/w0vDH
"…Tanga produced Now on his own, ensuring that his musical vision isn’t diluted in any way. That vision is ripe with inventiveness and a throwback ’70s style that still sounds fresh for 21st century ears. While many albums are front-loaded with the best material leading into filler, Now keeps sounding better and better, as if Tanga is gaining momentum as he goes along. Musically, the album is full of energy and sincere soulfulness, and while many of the lyrics deal with the unpleasant realities of war in his native land, Tanga never loses his uplifting spirit. On “Ngambe,” which begins with the sound of gunfire, Tanga sings “You play with guns to kill people/I play music to save people.”
Some of Now’s highlights in the funk and soul genres include “Upset,” a disco-funk track that is one of those rare songs that is just as heartfelt as it is ready for the dancefloor. The title track and “With You” are straight-up Al Green-style soul tracks, while “Now” also showcases Tanga’s funky bass playing. “Money Honey” sounds somewhere between P Funk and Frank Zappa– a mixture as thrilling as it looks on paper.
However, Now is just as much about the CAR and Tanga’s upbringing as it is about keeping alive the great sounds of decades past. The musical tradition of Central African Republic is present on Now, for instance in the song “Monteguene,” named after a rhythm played in the country’s Lobaye region. That rhythm has a stop-and-start quality that both stands out from other styles on the album and makes it immediately infectious. On “War,” Tanga raps, “We think we brave, but we digging our own grave” over a beat that wouldn’t sound out of place on a Devin the Dude album. Tonga, who grew up listening to the gospel singer Ella Jenkins, brings the influence of spirituals on “Who’s Gonna Be Your Man,” with harmonized singing of “Oh lordy me/Who’s going to be your man?”…

(via Bibi Tanga, “Now” • Afropop Worldwide)

Pre-order Now, out May 13 in the US! http://ow.ly/w0vDH

"…Tanga produced Now on his own, ensuring that his musical vision isn’t diluted in any way. That vision is ripe with inventiveness and a throwback ’70s style that still sounds fresh for 21st century ears. While many albums are front-loaded with the best material leading into filler, Now keeps sounding better and better, as if Tanga is gaining momentum as he goes along. Musically, the album is full of energy and sincere soulfulness, and while many of the lyrics deal with the unpleasant realities of war in his native land, Tanga never loses his uplifting spirit. On “Ngambe,” which begins with the sound of gunfire, Tanga sings “You play with guns to kill people/I play music to save people.”

Some of Now’s highlights in the funk and soul genres include “Upset,” a disco-funk track that is one of those rare songs that is just as heartfelt as it is ready for the dancefloor. The title track and “With You” are straight-up Al Green-style soul tracks, while “Now” also showcases Tanga’s funky bass playing. “Money Honey” sounds somewhere between P Funk and Frank Zappa– a mixture as thrilling as it looks on paper.

However, Now is just as much about the CAR and Tanga’s upbringing as it is about keeping alive the great sounds of decades past. The musical tradition of Central African Republic is present on Now, for instance in the song “Monteguene,” named after a rhythm played in the country’s Lobaye region. That rhythm has a stop-and-start quality that both stands out from other styles on the album and makes it immediately infectious. On “War,” Tanga raps, “We think we brave, but we digging our own grave” over a beat that wouldn’t sound out of place on a Devin the Dude album. Tonga, who grew up listening to the gospel singer Ella Jenkins, brings the influence of spirituals on “Who’s Gonna Be Your Man,” with harmonized singing of “Oh lordy me/Who’s going to be your man?”…

(via Music Center | Khukh Tenger & Huun-Huur-Tu)
Don’t miss Huun Huur Tu tomorrow at The Music Center in downtown Los Angeles!
Sunday, they play The Alberta Rose Theatre in Portland: http://ow.ly/vW9hr
Ancestors Call on iTunes: http://ow.ly/vmnU4

(via Music Center | Khukh Tenger & Huun-Huur-Tu)

Don’t miss Huun Huur Tu tomorrow at The Music Center in downtown Los Angeles!

Sunday, they play The Alberta Rose Theatre in Portland: http://ow.ly/vW9hr

Ancestors Call on iTunes: http://ow.ly/vmnU4

Huun Huur Tu plays Carnegie Hall next week on April 23! The concert is part of David Lang's curated festival called “Collected Stories” which showcases different modes of storytelling in music, from Medieval Beowulf to conceptual Cage to world premieres. http://ow.ly/vUnbq Get Huun Huur Tu’s Ancestors Call on iTunes: http://ow.ly/vmnU4

Huun Huur Tu plays Carnegie Hall next week on April 23! The concert is part of David Lang's curated festival called “Collected Stories” which showcases different modes of storytelling in music, from Medieval Beowulf to conceptual Cage to world premieres. http://ow.ly/vUnbq 

Get Huun Huur Tu’s Ancestors Call on iTunes: http://ow.ly/vmnU4

(via Huun-Huur-Tu | MIM Music Theater)
This week, catch Huun Huur Tu at the Musical Instrument Museum in Phoenix on Wednesday: http://ow.ly/vM5pv and The Harris Center at Folsom Lake College in Folsom, CA on Thursday: http://ow.ly/vM5Hr
The famous throat singers also join us in L.A. on Saturday at The Music Center and on Sunday at The Alberta Rose Theatre in Portland! http://ow.ly/vM678

(via Huun-Huur-Tu | MIM Music Theater)

This week, catch Huun Huur Tu at the Musical Instrument Museum in Phoenix on Wednesday: http://ow.ly/vM5pv and The Harris Center at Folsom Lake College in Folsom, CA on Thursday: http://ow.ly/vM5Hr

The famous throat singers also join us in L.A. on Saturday at The Music Center and on Sunday at The Alberta Rose Theatre in Portland! http://ow.ly/vM678

Huun Huur Tu: The Throat Singers of Tuva will perform at 8 p.m. April 12. At Kirk Road and Pine Street, Batavia. Call (630) 840-2787 or visitfnal.gov/culture. How much: $14-$28

5 things to do: ‘The Spitfire Grill’ - Aurora Beacon News

4/12 - Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory - Batavia, IL
4/13 - CSPS Hall - Cedar Rapids, IA
4/16 - Musical Instrument Museum - MIM - Phoenix, AZ
4/17 - Harris Center/Three Stages at Folsom Lake College - Folsom, CA

More Huun Huur Tu dates here: http://ow.ly/uNaqL Get Ancestors Call on iTunes: http://ow.ly/vmnU4

A fun instrumental from Melingo’s quirky new album Linyera!

(via  THE “TOM WAITS OF ARGENTINA”, MELINGO DEBUTS ON WORLD VILLAGE - harmonia mundi distribution)
“Linyera, a new collection of songs from the Argentinean singer-actor Melingo could be the soundtrack to a shady underworld, conjuring up as it does a chiaroscuro labyrinth of mirrors where time stands still. The album features offbeat love songs, sparkling with glints of the blues and tangos of old, vagrants’ tales sprinkled with snatches of bossa nova and candombe, and atmospheric melodies summoning up musical spirits - now of Duke, now of Zappa - all plunging us into Melingo’s surreal universe. In the company of his band of itinerant musician-poets, he is a free-spirited, definition-defying artist at the very zenith of his powers. Part rocker, part flamboyant crooner, with a touch of the comedian, as well as a multi-instrumentalist and composer, he bewitches us with intoxicating dreams.
Available now on World Village, Linyera will also receive a vinyl release in June. The album is currently No. 4 in the World Music Charts Europe Top Ten…” (click image for full text & video)
Get it on iTunes: http://ow.ly/uXPMs or Amazon:http://ow.ly/uXQvx

(via THE “TOM WAITS OF ARGENTINA”, MELINGO DEBUTS ON WORLD VILLAGE - harmonia mundi distribution)

Linyera, a new collection of songs from the Argentinean singer-actor Melingo could be the soundtrack to a shady underworld, conjuring up as it does a chiaroscuro labyrinth of mirrors where time stands still. The album features offbeat love songs, sparkling with glints of the blues and tangos of old, vagrants’ tales sprinkled with snatches of bossa nova and candombe, and atmospheric melodies summoning up musical spirits - now of Duke, now of Zappa - all plunging us into Melingo’s surreal universe. In the company of his band of itinerant musician-poets, he is a free-spirited, definition-defying artist at the very zenith of his powers. Part rocker, part flamboyant crooner, with a touch of the comedian, as well as a multi-instrumentalist and composer, he bewitches us with intoxicating dreams.

Available now on World Village, Linyera will also receive a vinyl release in June. The album is currently No. 4 in the World Music Charts Europe Top Ten…” (click image for full text & video)

Get it on iTunes: http://ow.ly/uXPMs or Amazon:http://ow.ly/uXQvx

Violons Barbares - Konil Ashar - ZNsessions (by Torzka)

Check out a live session of Violons Barbares playing “Konil Ashar” from their new World Village album Saulem ai.

The WholeNote
"…Early music enthusiasts will get their eye (or ear) drawn in with the well-known Lamento di Tristano which weaves its sedate course by bringing together Western European and Middle-Eastern instruments. This same combination forms Kalaitzidis’ choice for one of his own compositions, the equally sedate Marco’s Dream. What a contrast then with his second composition, Gallop, which conjures up Marco Polo confidently and swiftly crossing the Silk Road on his mission.
As Marco Polo moves eastward the music escorts him, as its style changes. In Migrants Circles lyrics by the 14th century Iranian poet Hafez are inspired by a Chinese melody. Kiya Tabassian (sitar and voice) brilliantly conveys the winding and demanding nature of Marco Polo’s journeyings.
 Then the traveller reaches Uzbekistan for perhaps the most impassioned song on the CD: Ey Dilbari Jonomin(Oh, my heart-stealing beauty) where the voices of Kalaitzidis and Nodira Permatova are allowed to express the song’s haunting quality, accompanied only by oud, viola and violin. All too soon we are back on the road east with Five steps, a piece played on Nepalese sarangi to guide us to Mongolia, where Chandmani nutagevokes the latter’s grasslands and streams…”

The WholeNote

"…Early music enthusiasts will get their eye (or ear) drawn in with the well-known Lamento di Tristano which weaves its sedate course by bringing together Western European and Middle-Eastern instruments. This same combination forms Kalaitzidis’ choice for one of his own compositions, the equally sedate Marco’s Dream. What a contrast then with his second composition, Gallop, which conjures up Marco Polo confidently and swiftly crossing the Silk Road on his mission.

As Marco Polo moves eastward the music escorts him, as its style changes. In Migrants Circles lyrics by the 14th century Iranian poet Hafez are inspired by a Chinese melody. Kiya Tabassian (sitar and voice) brilliantly conveys the winding and demanding nature of Marco Polo’s journeyings.

 Then the traveller reaches Uzbekistan for perhaps the most impassioned song on the CD: Ey Dilbari Jonomin(Oh, my heart-stealing beauty) where the voices of Kalaitzidis and Nodira Permatova are allowed to express the song’s haunting quality, accompanied only by oud, viola and violin. All too soon we are back on the road east with Five steps, a piece played on Nepalese sarangi to guide us to Mongolia, where Chandmani nutagevokes the latter’s grasslands and streams…”

Daniel Melingo is one of the quirky celebrities of the Buenos Aires tango scene. He’s a singer and actor with a gruff voice and a stage persona that veers between Charlie Chaplin and Tom Waits. But he’s also an impressive multi-instrumentalist who plays guitar, keyboards and clarinet, and has set out to provide new and often experimental settings for Argentina’s most celebrated dance style. As ever, he sings about his city’s lowlife, and uses the persona of a linyera (a vagabond) as the starting point for his unusual and sophisticated songs. The opener, La Cancion De Linyera, is a jaunty tango driven on by the bandoneon concertina, but elsewhere he adds bluesy guitar lines and jazzy trombone, and includes a charming, crooned treatment of a song by the great Chilean singer Violeta Parra, and his own setting of a Lorca poem.